September 2016 District and State News

Posted on September 1, 2016

 

State News

IACAC

 

The Indiana Association for College Admission Counseling (IACAC) is the local NACAC affiliate and a professional organization dedicated to encouraging, advocating and facilitating equal access to post-secondary education through networking, professional development and leadership opportunities, college fairs, and job postings and opportunities. Members come from high schools in Indiana, colleges and universities both in-state and out-of-state, non-profit organizations serving college admissions, and also comprise independent counselors and consultants, and pre-professionals (students interested in the field). IACAC supports and advances the work of counseling and enrollment professionals as they help students of diverse backgrounds in the transition to post-secondary education. More information including how to join can be found at www.iacac.net.

 

District 1

 

ATTICA CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL CORPORATION

 

205 E. SYCAMORE STREET

ATTICA, INDIANA 47918

765-762-7000

FAX 765-762-7007

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date September 1, 2016

Re: Attica Elementary School Student Council

 

The AES Student Council has been named a 2015 – 2016 IASC Honor Council.  This is the 21st year that they have received this distinct honor.

 

AES Student Council cosponsor, Janice Tague, stated “I am so proud of all the student council members that help the community and various organizations in so many ways. The support that we get from AES students, staff, administration, and the community is amazing. I am looking forward to another great year and continuing to strive to be recognized as a member of one of Indiana’s Elementary Honor Councils again this year”.

 

The Elementary Honor Councils will be celebrated on September 24th at the Indiana Association of Student Councils Elementary Back-to-School Kickoff Conference.  This conference will be held on the campus of IUPUI in Indianapolis. Riley Hospital’s Kids Caring & Sharing will also be a part of this event.

 

AES Student Council cosponsor, Tori Current, remarked “It has been an honor to work with the AES Student Council.  It warms my heart to see the students work so hard for their fellow classmates and community.  The students are always so eager to make a difference.  I am excited as we enter a new year with a lot of fresh ideas and ways to serve the community.”

District 6

Four Ways In Which Nettle Creek School Corporation Is Growing @ The Creek!

Area 1: What We Know For quite some time Nettle Creek teachers have asked for more opportunities to learn what the field of education is discovering about how children learn and for opportunities to learn new strategies teachers can use in their classrooms to meet the requirements of Indiana’s new academic standards. NCSC has created a new position and hired Ms. Laura Swain as a curriculum coordinator/instructional coach to meet this request.   Ms. Swain not only brings a deep understanding of educational best practices, but she will also be in classrooms every day to follow up and to help all teachers grow in the areas of planning, instruction and assessment.

Area 2: The Time We Need Teachers spend a good part of their summers reading and attending professional workshops. A strategy that has proven effective elsewhere is to embed time within the school year to continue their learning and for teachers to collaborate with one another to share what is working in K-12 classrooms at Nettle Creek. Our teachers have asked for time to learn from each other. NCSC is implementing a Condensed Day schedule this year that will allow teachers to collaborate for forty-five minutes two times per month so that they can bring what they learn back to their own students.

Area 3: The Tools We Use Nettle Creek School Corporation initiated an ambitious technology plan two years ago that has brought iPads and interactive projectors to the elementary school and Chrome Books to students in grades 6-12. This year, NCSC students in grades 3, 4 and 5 will begin using Chrome Books 1:1 as well. Students in grades K-12 have new math materials that are better aligned to state standards and include a hybrid situation that uses textbooks and online materials.

Area 4: Accountability While the State of Indiana works through their challenges of replacing ISTEP+, Nettle Creek is implementing its own assessment plan to track student progress throughout the year so teachers can adjust instruction based on midyear results. All students, K-12, will take MAP tests three times this year. This expansion will require grades 7-12 teachers to GROW @ THE CREEK to learn how to use the results to inform their instruction. MAP results will be sent home, and parents can watch their student’s progress over the year, too. A Jr./Sr. high teacher who has jumped into this MAP initiative with both feet discovered that senior high MAP scores can actually be used to help students as they choose colleges!

Randolph Eastern School Corporation:

We started a Criminal Justice I class this year. This was through a collaboration between Randolph Eastern School Corporation and the Union City Police Department.  Our School Resource Officer has obtained a Workplace Specialist license so we are receiving CTE funding and students are receiving four credits for the year-long class.  Through this collaboration, we do not pay our SRO; he is paid through the City. This has tremendously strengthened the corporation’s relationship with the community.   We are very excited about this collaboration and are using the same model to consider offering Fire and Rescue next year.

Anderson Community Schools

Good morning!  I am the administrative assistant to Mr. Terry Thompson, superintendent, Anderson Community Schools.  He has asked me to send you the five-year discipline trends for in-school suspension, out-of-school suspension, and expulsions showing the great change we are succeeding with here at ACS as an article for the IAPSS newsletter.

Diane Fredrick

The following URL is the link to view the results of the Anderson article:

http://iapss-in.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Suspensions-Expulsions-5-yr.-trend.pdf

Elwood

First School-Based Telehealth Clinic in Indiana Opens in Elwood, Indiana

A Partnership between Elwood Community School Corporation, St. Vincent Mercy, Aspire Indiana, Indiana Rural Health Association and Managed Health Services

 

The Elwood Community School Corporation (ECSC) will be home to a first of its kind program designed to boost the quality and availability care in rural Indiana Schools. Delivering quality in-school healthcare is the focus of Indiana Rural Health Association’s (IRHA) newly established Indiana Rural School Clinic Network (IRSCN), which is expected to create new telehealth best practices for rural school healthcare in Indiana.

Launched from a partnership between ECSC, St. Vincent Mercy, Aspire Indiana, IRHA, and Managed Health Services (MHS), the school-based telehealth clinic gives students the opportunity to be seen by a licensed healthcare provider without leaving school. This will help reduce the amount of time spent out of the classroom, resulting in better school outcomes.

“I am excited about the opportunity to open a telehealth clinic that will allow for students to be seen by a local physician at school,” said Elwood Schools Superintendent Dr. Chris Daughtry. “It is a great opportunity for students to receive top-notch healthcare without being pulled from school and without interrupting the parent’s day. It demonstrates a real commitment to provide our students with the best services.”

Dr. Robert Zentz with St. Vincent Medical Group will see students for physical health needs, and Aspire Indiana will provide behavorial telehealth services to students in need. All services provided at the telehealth clinic will be billed to the insurance provider just as if the student had been seen at the doctor’s office. All prescriptions will be sent to the pharmacy for parents to pick up. If the student does not have insurance, services will be provided on a sliding scale fee based on income. No student will be denied services because of the inability to pay.

Rural residents and low-income families face difficulties accessing quality healthcare, including barriers such as transportation and time off work for working parents. “This program is a good example of five different entities and a lot of community members coming together to do something for our children and families. I am excited about this opportunity”, stated Dr. Daughtry.

The ribbon-cutting ceremony and official launch date of the school-based telehealth clinic was September 6, 2016.